There are significant weaknesses in Romney's $4,200 proposal for child tax credits, according to a nonpartisan report

There are significant weaknesses in Romney's $4,200 proposal for child tax credits, according to a nonpartisan report

Payments of up to $4,200 a year is a welcome development, but also has problems.

The Family Security Act 2.0 was introduced last month by Sens. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) 

And Richard Burr (R-N.C.) and Steve Daines (R-Mont.). The goal is to create a sustainable monthly 

Child tax credit similar to the American Rescue Plan's expanded CTC.

Previously that the Family Security Act 2.0 encourages work

And supports pregnancy. As a result, parents would receive $350 per month for each child ages five and

Under ($4,200 annually) and $250 per month for each child ages six to 17 ($3,000 annually).

A total of $2,800 would be available to expectant parents during the last four months of their pregnancy.

Families would need to earn $10,000 in the previous year to qualify for full benefits, The Hill reported. 

Benefits would be proportional to income for those earning less than $10,000. 

If a household earns $5,000 a year, it would receive half of the maximum child tax credit.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP), 

A nonpartisan research and policy institute, has criticized the earnings requirement.

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